Blackmail Through Snapchat

There are some things you hear that you simply can’t believe. You say, “No. No way. That’s not happening. Is it?”

There’s an epidemic going around with Snapchat and our teens. Snapchat, if you didn’t know, is a photo/video/texting service that allows people to quickly send messages and funny animations back and forth between their friends. Lots of services do this, but the distinguishing feature of Snapchat has been that the pictures and videos are only available for a short time, a few seconds, and then they disappear.

In case you didn’t know, Snapchat, as quoted by its own creators, was originally designed for sexting – sending nude photos back and forth so that they self-destructed after a few seconds, to never be seen again, and to only be seen by those viewing it at that time.

Only it doesn’t work that way.

Because we always find loopholes. Whether it’s with scripture, our taxes, or Snapchat, we always find loopholes to justify what we want to do.

Teens are now using Snapchat to blackmail one another.

Let me walk you through a scenario. A scenario that a friend recently told me about that actually happened.

Girl meets Boy. They hit it off. Both are upper-middle school, age 14. They immediately friend each other on Snapchat, because if you’re between the ages of 13-18 these days and don’t have Snapchat on your phone, you might as well be wearing hand-me-downs and shoes from 1998.

Things are fine for a while between Girl and Boy. They send goofy pics with text on them, all of it harmless.

Then one day, Boy asks Girl to send him a nude picture of herself. She does.

Why does she? She wants approval from this Boy. She wants to be sexy. She wants him to like her. She also figures that, “Hey, he’s only going to be able to see this for 10 seconds, right? Because Snapchat photos go away.”

Only they don’t. Not when the Boy takes a screenshot on his phone.

It’s a handy tool on iPhones – you can take a screenshot of what’s on the screen by hitting the power button and the home button at the same time.

The Girl had not thought of that.

So the Boy blackmails her. “I have the photo,” he says. “Send me a video of you doing _____ or I send this picture to all your friends.”

Now, there’s lots of things that should not have happened here. But regardless, this is apparently a regular occurrence between teens on Snapchat. In talking to my friend about his situation, he said that the girl had said “Yeah, of course. This is a normal thing that happens. Especially with kids in high school.”

Parents, how are we letting this happen? Are we that clueless?

You know of a good way for this not to happen? Don’t let you children have this app!

Parents, this is out of control. We always want to assume that our child would have the sense not to do something like this, but we would be naive and wrong.

Check your children’s phones today. Have them delete Snapchat, along with any other apps that hide use from parents (apps like Whisper, Yik-Yak, and Tinder come to mind). Ask the hard questions like “Have you done this before? Do you know people who do? Have you ever been asked to send nude photos of yourself?”
Parents, make a stand. Now. Before your child gets into lots of trouble.

Chad Landman is the youth minister for the Church Street Church of Christ in Lewisburg, Tennessee where he has served for four years. He and his wife Bonnie have two boys—Jacob and David. Chad writes about technology and Christianity on his website at chadl.co, and talks to other ministers and youth ministers about technology on his podcast called Ministry Bits. He speaks frequently at area churches using his Active Digital Parenting curriculum, now a weekly blog at Start2Finish.org.

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